Category Archives: Computers

Maps of various things

These are  really neat.

 

This map shows what is on the other side of the world from where you are standing.  For the most part it will probably be water.

This map shows what is on the other side of the world from where you are standing.  For the most part it will probably be water.

This map shows the world divided into 7 sections (each with a distinct color) with each section containing 1 billion people.

This map shows the world divided into 7 sections (each with a distinct color) with each section containing 1 billion people.

This map shows the most photographed places in the world.

This map shows the most photographed places in the world.

This map shows the longest straight line you can sail.  It goes from Pakistan all the way to Kamchatka Peninsula in Russia for a total of 20,000 miles.

This map shows the longest straight line you can sail.  It goes from Pakistan all the way to Kamchatka Peninsula in Russia for a total of 20,000 miles.

This map shows the countries that heavily restricted Internet access in 2013.

This map shows the countries that heavily restricted Internet access in 2013.

This map shows the countries (in blue) where people drive on the left side of the road.

This map shows the countries (in blue) where people drive on the left side of the road.

This map shows how much space the United States would occupy on the moon.

This map shows how much space the United States would occupy on the moon.

This map shows countries (in white) that England has never invaded.  There are only 22 of them.

This map shows countries (in white) that England has never invaded.  There are only 22 of them.

This map shows (in white) where 98 percent of Australia's population lives.

This map shows (in white) where 98 percent of Australia’s population lives.

This map shows (in red, orange, and yellow) the world's largest donors of foreign aid with red being the biggest donor.

This map shows (in red, orange, and yellow) the world’s largest donors of foreign aid with red being the biggest donor.

This map shows (in blue) places where Google street view is available.

This map shows (in blue) places where Google street view is available.

This map highlights the countries (in red and orange) with the most skyscrapers.

This map highlights the countries (in red and orange) with the most skyscrapers.

This is a map of the highest paid public employees in the United States.

This is a map of the highest paid public employees in the United States.

This is a map of the all the rivers in the United States.

This is a map of the all the rivers in the United States.

This is a map of 19th century shipping lanes that outlines the continents.

This is a map of 19th century shipping lanes that outlines the continents.

These are all the rivers that feed into the Mississippi River.

These are all the rivers that feed into the Mississippi River.

The line in this map shows all of the world's Internet connections in 1969.

The line in this map shows all of the world’s Internet connections in 1969.

It may not come as a surprise but more people live inside the circle than outside of it.

It may not come as a surprise but more people live inside the circle than outside of it.

Apparently you can't get Big Macs everywhere.  This map shows (in red) the countries that have McDonalds.

Apparently you can’t get Big Macs everywhere.  This map shows (in red) the countries that have McDonalds.

And this map shows all the places where you can get eaten by a Great White shark!

And this map shows all the places where you can get eaten by a Great White shark!

And this is what the world would look like if all the countries with coast lines sank.

And this is what the world would look like if all the countries with coast lines sank.

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Personal Selling

Found a neat website on selling techniques. Click here for the article.

Is the Arctic Really Drunk, or Does It Just Act Like This Sometimes?

The analysis of our weather pattern by this scientist actually makes sense. Think about when you mix hot and cold water in a glass and add food colouring, the two different temperatures of water swirl around and you can see it because of the food colouring. I feel our weather is no different only we don’t have the luxury of food colouring but we feel it because our weather is definitely different. Click here to read the full article or read an excerpt below.

Just when weather weary Americans thought they’d found a reprieve, the latest forecasts suggest that the polar vortex will, again, descend into the heart of the country next week, bringing with it staggering cold. If so, it will be just the latest weather extreme in a winter that has seen so many of them. California has been extremely dry, while the flood-soaked UK has been extremely wet. Alaska has been extremely hot (as has Sochi), while the snow-pummeled US East Coast has been extremely cold. They’re all different, and yet on a deeper level, perhaps, they’re all the same.

This weather now serves as the backdrop—and perhaps, as the inspiration—for an increasingly epic debate within the field of climate research. You see, one climate researcher, Jennifer Francis of Rutgers University, has advanced an influential theory suggesting that winters like this one may be growing more likely to occur. The hypothesis is that by rapidly melting the Arctic, global warming is slowing down the fast-moving river of air far above us known as the jet stream—in turn causing weather patterns to get stuck in place for longer, and leading to more extremes of the sort that we’ve all been experiencing. “There is a lot of pretty tantalizing evidence that our hypothesis seems to be bearing some fruit,” Francis explained on the latest installment of the Inquiring Minds podcast. The current winter is a “perfect example” of the kind of jet stream pattern that her research predicts, Francis added (although she emphasized that no one atmospheric event can be directly blamed on climate change).

Red Hood Project

More and better protection is required to protect children and individuals from being preyed on and stalked through online websites and media. Its everyone’s responsibility to talk with our children to make them aware of the hazards to stop another young child from committing suicide like Amanda Todd. My hat goes off to her Mom for trying to get her and her daughter’s message out to spare other children. Learn and join the Red Hood Project movement. Thanks, MB.

Do We Really Want to Live Without the Post Office?

I found this article when I was reading the Editor’s Picks on The Feature website and I think the excerpt below highlights the changing face of the post office. Its the glue that binds us together.

Inside the lobby of the first co-op, Mitchell pushes his cart to the side, opens the first of four banks of mailboxes. When he first started this route, he was very quiet and kept his head down. The residents, perhaps unfairly, had a reputation for being a bit difficult, and he just wanted to make sure he did a good job.

You work a job like this one long enough and you develop your own system. Like the notes Mitchell writes to himself about his customers’ travel schedules and bundles with their mail so that he doesn’t forget. He sandwiches each customer’s mail between a lightly folded bill so that it’s easy to tell where one person’s deliveries end and another’s begin. After he finishes a bank of mailboxes, he rests a small plastic sign on the bank’s metal lip: MAIL IS FINISHED. He made these signs so that residents know when he’s passed through for the day.

Over time, he went from working silently to exchanging pleasantries to eventually being sought out for advice by the building’s residents. They call him “the psychiatrist.” “Hey, Tony,” they yell as they enter. “Oh, he’s the best,” says another as she passes through the lobby. Like a village bartender, there isn’t much he isn’t asked about. Sports, religion, health, gospel music. And throughout, there’s his ever-present disarming laughter.

Since 1990, Mitchell’s worked this route, stood in the lobby of this sixties-era apartment building, unbundling mail and stuffing metal mailboxes. You see a lot. Residents who once greeted him downstairs now greet him at their doors when Mitchell brings up their medication. He’s seen spouses divorce and pass away. He’s seen babies born, hundreds of them, and watched them grow up and leave the building in their soccer uniforms and then their graduation suits. He’s been invited to baby showers and barbecues, and sometimes he’ll invite a resident to a football game.

He’s seen a lot and he’s learned a lot, he says. He’s learned to say hello to every resident he sees, his smile always open, ready to connect. And he’s learned to listen.

“Hi, brother,” shouts a man passing through, balding and wearing a loose-fitting sweatshirt.

“Take care, take care,” Mitchell shouts back, his tall frame and broad shoulders bending down to reach into his mail trolley for another bundle.

When he finishes this building, he’ll go on to the next one, then the next, as he’s done nearly every day for two decades, touching every mailbox on his route, the final link in a network that binds us all.

The 15 Best Websites, According to Redditors

I am familiar with some of these sites but I have never even heard of others. Click here for the list.

The 50 Free Apps We’re Most Thankful For

I know and like most of the apps mentioned in this article so I’m sure the ones that I don’t know about must be good too! Click here to read the article. Cheers!