(CVRD) Comox Valley Regional District – Water Quality and Reports

Drinking water treated only with chlorine is risky for a few reasons. With all centralized water treatment systems, water suppliers have to use chlorine in our distribution systems (the pipes between the treatment system to our homes) so we don’t drink contaminated water when we get water from the tap. And no bottled water isn’t any safer for the same reasons. I will try to explain below:

  • There is no reliable test to detect cryptosporidium and giardia according to Health Canada on 2009-02-06 and still posted online today,
  • Chlorinated water treatment systems do not kill cryptosporidium or giardia according to Health Canada on 2009-02-06 and still posted online today,
  •  Bottled water isn’t any safer because they are unable to run reliable tests to detect cryptosporidium and giardia,
  • Since 2007, Applications for new water supply systems, which include a surface water source will need to be in compliance with the policy to provide 2 treatment processes acceptable to VIHA, achieve a 4-log removal/inactivation of viruses and 3-log removal/inactivation of parasites, and produce a finished water with less than 1 NTU turbidity.
  • Since 2007, Vancouver Island Health Authority under Section 8(4) of the Act with regard to the proposed attachment of the following condition to their operating permit, “By (date to be determined), this system will provide 2 treatment processes acceptable to VIHA, achieve a 4-log removal/inactivation of viruses and 3-log removal/inactivation of parasites, and produce a finished water with less than 1 NTU turbidity.”
  • The 2009 report showed that a submerged pipeline intake and a surface transmission pipeline would be the most economical option both in terms of capital and lifecycle costs. A preliminary class D level cost estimate of $53 million has been developed for the construction of this project. While the intake project has been designed strictly to achieve improved water quality, it would be sized to meet the water demand over a 50-year design horizon. As such, the report also recommended that efforts to reduce future water demand be employed, as they will reduce the required sizing, and thus costs, of the new intake and any future water treatment facilities.

LEGAL IMPLICATIONS CVRD is required to meet various water quality standards as set out in provincial legislation and as directed by the Vancouver Island Health Authority. The CVRD is currently in compliance with legislated standards, but not with VIHA’s 4-3-2-1 standards policy for surface water supplies. While the latter is at this time a policy, VIHA does have the legal authority to require CVRD to take steps towards compliance (through order or amendment of operating permit). Further, compliance represents responsible management of the regions drinking water.

 

  • Point of Use and Point of Entry systems provide homeowners with the safest and most economical drinking water.

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Giardia and Cryptosporidium in Drinking Water

nd chlorinated water treatment systems don`t kill these parasites so

There is no reliable test to detect Cryptosporidium and Giardias and chlorinated water treatment systems don`t kill these parasites. Bottled water isn`t any safer for the same reasons. Invest in point of use systems  your home.

I recommend installing point-of-use/point-of-entry treatment devices in your home to minimize your risk to

Click on the links to learn more about why you should be concerned or read the excerpts below.

 

There is no reliable test to detect cryptosporidium and giardias and chlorinated water treatment systems don`t kill these parasites so read below to learn more about why you should be concerned. Click here to learn more about Giardiasis the entire study abstract, or read an excerpt below.

Comox Valley Water Quality Reports state “chlorine is the only substance added into the water system

The Comox Valley Regional District, our water supplier states: “We add small amounts of chlorinated gas to our water to ensure it is suitable to drink. The Ministry of Health requires a level of chlorine in all drinking water between .25 and .3 parts per million. Each year we do an analysis of the water that covers all Canadian drinking water guidelines. At the moment we aim to achieve 0.5mg per litre, of free chlorine residual in water samples taken at the ends of each the system. At present, chlorine is the only substance added into the water system: none of the four systems have (or have required) additional water treatment to date.” More on the pdf file.

 

Giardia And Cryptosporidium In Drinking Water

Are water supplies tested for Giardia and Cryptosporidium?

Unfortunately, no reliable methods are currently available to detect these parasites on a routine basis. This is largely because the methods underestimate the number of organisms present and do not provide any information on their capacity to cause illness in humans. The tests that do exist take a few days to come up with results which means they aren’t very good for day-to-day monitoring. Research* is underway in Canada and internationally to develop appropriate detection methods and treatment technology to safeguard drinking water against these parasites.

*Note this page was last modified on 2009-02-06 which means they have been trying to solve this gap in testing for Giardia and Cryptosporidium for 7 years without success. 

 

Giardiasis

In addition to humans, other sources of infection include beavers, perhaps muskrats, and possibly domestic animals. A low infecting dose (10 to 25 cysts) is reported to be sufficient to produce human infection. Clinical manifestations range from asymptomatic to a transient or persistent acute stage, with steatorrhea, intermittent diarrhea, and weight loss, or to a subacute or chronic stage that can mimic gallbladder or peptic ulcer disease. Diagnosis is usually based on repeated stool examinations but examination of duodenal fluid or biopsy material may also be necessary. Enzyme immunoassay or indirect immunofluorescence methods for direct detection of antigen or whole organisms in clinical specimens have also been developed. These tests are reported to be more sensitive than routine stool examination. Demonstration of serum immunoglobulin M and G antibodies may help differentiate recent from past infection or help detect recurrence in individuals who have been treated previously. Serum immunoglobulin A levels may be a useful indicator of exposure in waterborne outbreaks of diarrhea.

 

Drinking Water Best Management Practices

Install point-of-use/point-of-entry treatment devices

A point-of-use (POU) device is a filtration system, such as a carbon filter, that can be installed directly on a drinking water outlet. A point-of-entry (POE) device is a filtration system that is installed where the water main enters the facility and treats all the water in your building.

 

 

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